About The Author

Martha Langford

Martha Langford is the Research Chair and Director of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art and a professor of Art History at Concordia University in Montreal. The author of numerous articles on photography and contemporary art, Langford has published the following titles with McGill-Queen’s University Press: Suspended Conversations: The Afterlife of Memory in Photographic Albums (2001); Scissors, Paper, Stone: Expressions of Memory in Contemporary Photographic Art (2007); A Cold War Tourist and His Camera, co-written with John Langford (2011); and Image & Imagination (2005), an edited collection.

 

Langford has written the first comprehensive survey of modern Canadian photographic art: “A Short History of Photography, 1900–2000,” in The Visual Arts in Canada: The Twentieth Century, edited by Anne Whitelaw, Brian Foss, and Sandra Paikowsky (Oxford University Press, 2010). She and a team of graduate students are developing Canadian Photography History, a guided open-access resource for researchers and scholars working on the history of Canadian photography.

 

She is a contributing editor for Border Crossings (Winnipeg), Exit (Madrid), Photography & Culture (London), and Ciel variable (Montreal), and a regular book reviewer for Source (Belfast). She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Canadian Art History / Annales d’histoire de l’art canadien and co-editor (with Sandra Paikowsky) of the MQUP / Beaverbrook Canadian Foundation Studies in Art History.

 

Langford is currently completing an intellectual biography of Michael Snow. This research has already generated numerous conference papers, book chapters, and catalogue essays, including “Repetition / La Répétition: Michael Snow and the Act of Memory,” in Michael Snow: Almost Cover to Cover, edited by Catsou Roberts and Lucy Steeds (Black Dog Publishing, 2001); “Michael Snow: Screen Writing,” Switch 3 (Spring 2010); and “Translation, Migration, Fascination: Motion Pictures by Michael Snow,” in Michael Snow: Recent Works (Secession, 2012).

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